Hennepin Civil Court

Civil Court handles non-criminal cases involving contracts, personal injury, property claims, name changes, implied consent, harassments, and more.
Quick Links:

The 4th District Civil Court Division is located in the C-Tower of the Hennepin County Government Center (where to link?) in downtown Minneapolis. The main in-person customer service area is the Civil Filing Counter on the 3rd floor. The Civil Division handles a range of civil case types from complex contract and personal injury cases, to harassment and administrative default cases. Our mission is to provide excellent customer service to all court users, including the public, parties, justice agencies, and the media.

Conciliation Court and Housing Court are also part of Hennepin Civil Court.
eFile and eServe is available in the 4th Judicial District for legal professionals and justice partners in these case types:  
  • Civil, Family, and Housing (mandatory EFS)
  • Conciliation, Criminal, and Juvenile (voluntary EFS)
  • Probate and Mental Health (voluntary EFS)
Faxes are accepted by Hennepin County District Court Civil Division (FAX (612) 348-2131) in accordance with MN Rules of Civil Procedure 5.05

Effective January 1, 2006: by order of the Supreme Court, the following changes were made to MN Rule of Civil Procedure commonly referred to as the fax filing rule: 
  • The original must not be filed but must be maintained in the files of the transmitting party and made available to the court or any party to the action upon request.
  • The fee is increased from $5 per transmission to $25 per 50 pages transmitted or part thereof.  This fee must be paid within 5 days of the transmission. Civil Filing will monitor the faxes for payment of the fee and will notify the judge if the fee has not been paid timely. Pay any applicable filing fees.
Civil judges handled a "block" of cases, and the cases are initially assigned to civil judges on a random basis. For the following types of cases, once a case has been assigned, that judge handles that case all the way to the final disposition: 
  • Appeals from administrative agency
  • Appointment of Trustee
  • Assessment appeal
  • Change of name
  • Civil other / miscellaneous
  • Class action lawsuit
  • Consumer credit
  • Conciliation appeal
  • Condemnation contract
  • Discrimination
  • Employment
  • Forfeiture Malpractice
  • Mechanics lien
  • Minor settlement
  • Personal injury
  • Product liability
  • Property damage
  • Quiet title
  • Receivership
  • Replevin
  • Sexual harassment
  • Welfare appeal
  • Wrongful death 
The court sends a "Notice of Judge Assignment" (or Reassignment) only to the first attorney for a party listed on the Certificate of Representation. That attorney is responsible for notifying all other attorneys representing the party. The filing attorney (or party) is responsible for notifying all attorneys (or parties) not listed on the Certificate of Representation.
Filing a notice to remove the assigned judicial officer must comply with MN Rule of Civil Procedure 63.03 and MN Statute § 542.16. If the notice to remove complies with the law, the case will be reassigned randomly to another judicial officer. The court will then send a "Notice of Judge Reassignment" to the attorney (or party) listed on the Certificate of Representation.
District Court staff screen temporary restraining orders (TROs), injunctions and other emergency requests prior to accepting a filing and assigning a judge. If an emergency request needs immediate assignment, the matter is referred to a civil judge located in the Hennepin County Govt. Center. That judge (or judicial staff) will then handle the scheduling of the case.
 
Summons and complaints (or verified complaints) are required for lawsuits, along with supporting documents relating to the request for an emergency filing (motions, affidavits, etc.). For other case types that do not require a summons and complaint, a petition, notice of motion and motion, and supporting documents will suffice, as long as there are supporting documents that justify immediate assignment of a judge.
MN Court Rule 113.02 Consolidation of cases within a judicial district:   a motion asking that two or more cases pending in a single Judicial District be assigned to one judge must be made to the Chief Judge of the District in which the cases are pending, or the Chief Judge's designee.
 
In the Fourth Judicial District, the presiding judge of Civil Court hears contested motions and reviews stipulations on these cases. The best practice used when ordering consolidation and assignment is to assign all cases to the judge who has the earliest case (by file date).
Judges hear post-disposition matters on their assigned cases as long as they still work in the civil division. They generally do not hear post-disposition matters in civil cases after they have been assigned to another area of the court.
Some civil lawsuits started in Minnesota District Courts end up in "default" and can be processed by the court "administratively," i.e., without a judge. A case ends up in default as described in MN Rule of Civil Procedure 55.  See the Civil Actions Help Topic for more detailed information.  A civil case in default may be processed administratively only if the following requirements are met:
  • the defendant(s) were served a Summons and Complaint;
  • the time for defendant(s) to answer has passed;
  • plaintiff(s) received no response from defendant(s); and
  • the case type is the kind that may be processed administratively.
Case types that may be processed administratively:
  • Confession of judgment
  • Contract for deed
  • Goods sold and services rendered
  • Loan agreements in default
  • Past due unpaid rent or lease agreements
  • Promissory notes (need original note)
  • Recovery of NSF (non-sufficient funds) checks
  • Stated Account
  • Unpaid taxes to State of Minnesota
The following Case Types may NOT be processed administratively and will be randomly assigned to a judge. If a case is assigned to a judge, the court will send a Notice of Judicial Assignment to all parties.
 
  • Auto accidents
  • Civil theft
  • Conversion of Funds
  • Fraud or misrepresentation
  • Future damages
  • Mechanics liens
  • Personal injuries
  • Property damage
  • Replevin - return of property
  • Unspecified dollar amounts
  • Wages, salary, and commission
To ask that a judgment entered by default on an administrative basis, the following documents must be filed with the court along with the required filing fees:
  • Summons and Complaint;
  • Affidavit of Service of Summons and Complaint;
  • Affidavit of No Answer, Non-Military Service, Identification, Amount Due and Costs and Disbursements (also known as a five-part affidavit);
  • Supporting documents and exhibits to prove up your case; and
  • Proof of service of the Notice and Request for Hearing to Determine Attorneys' Fee Award pursuant to MN Rules of Gen. Practice 119, if applicable. NOTE: The Notice and Request for Hearing to Determine Attorneys' Fee Award can only be served AFTER the party has defaulted.
After these documents are filed, the court clerk will review the court file for documentation that supports the judgment amount requested, and for documentation that supports any requested attorney’s fees. If additional documentation or information is required, the court will notify the party who asked to finish the case by administrative default. Once everything is submitted and reviewed, judgment can be entered administratively, and the court will send a Notice of Entry and/or Docketing of Judgment to the parties.

Appeal a Case?  

IMPORTANT! It is very difficult to appeal a case to the Minnesota Supreme Court or the Court of Appeals. An appeal is NOT a "do over" of the case. Appellate Courts review decisions the trial court judge made about the law, but not questions about the facts. If you are representing yourself in court, we strongly encourage you to talk to a lawyer to get advice on whether an appeal is the best option for you, and on how to write a "brief" and present an oral argument if you plan to represent yourself. Court staff cannot give you any legal advice. See also Appeals Help Topic.
 

What do I do if my case was remanded back to the District Court after an appeal?

If the appeal of your case is complete and it was remanded back to the District Court, you can contact the judge's clerk or Court Administration to find out the next steps in the process.
 

What can be appealed?

Only certain orders and judgments issued in Civil Court can be appealed, and they are listed in Rule 103.03 of the MN Rules of Civil Appellate Procedure. An "Order for Judgment" is not an appealable order under the rules.

If you want to "appeal" a judgment from Conciliation Court, the process is called "removal," and you file forms that ask the court to transfer it up to the District level Civil Court. 
 

When is the deadline to appeal?

The deadline to appeal depends on the type of case. Please read the MN Rules of Court, Civil Appellate Procedure, Rule 104.01 to learn the deadline to appeal for your case type. You can also learn more about the time to appeal at the Court of Appeals webpage.
 

Do I have to tell the District Court if I decide to file an appeal?

Yes. If you appeal a judgment or order that was issued in the Hennepin County District Court, you must file the following with the Hennepin County District Court:
  1. a copy of your Notice of Appeal; AND
  2. a "cost bond" of $500 (purchased from an insurance or bonding company) OR a "deposit" of $500 (check or money order). See MN Rule Civil Appellate Procedure 107.01. The cost bond or deposit provides security for the payment of costs that may be awarded to the other parties if the case is affirmed on appeal.
If you cannot afford the bond or deposit, you may file a Court of Appeals IFP / Fee Waiver request with the Hennepin County District Court. The proposed IFP Order for Court of Appeals can only be signed by the District Court judge.

Any amount of the bond or deposit to be returned to the appealing party (appellant) will be determined by the Hennepin County trial judge, who is guided by the terms of the Appellate Court judgment. The appellant must request the refund by sending a proposed order for the release of the appropriate amount to the District Court judge assigned to the case.
 
File in person:
Go to the Civil Intake counter on the Public Service Level (2nd floor) of the Hennepin County Government Center in downtown Minneapolis.

File by mail:
Hennepin County District Court
Attn: Civil Filing
300 South 6th Street, #C-332
Minneapolis, MN 55487-0332

eFile for Attorneys Only:
Attorneys must e-file the Notice of Appeal in District Court, and file the cost bond (or waiver) in person or by mail.
 

Ask for Default Judgment?

See the Default Judgements tab on this page.

Get Copies of Court Records and Judgments?

Visit the Court Records tab on the Hennepin County page.

Get a Harassment Restraining Order against someone?

Visit the Domestic Abuse and Harassment Help Topic.
 

File Documents in Court?

Documents on Hennepin Civil cases can be eFiled, filed in person or by mail or by fax.

4th District Civil Court
Hennepin County Govt. Ctr.
300 South 6th Street, C-332
Minneapolis, MN 5548 Map
Phone: (612) 348-3164
Fax: (612) 348-2131

File for Name Change?

Visit the Name Change tab on this page or the Name Change Help Topic for more info.
 

Get a subpoena?

Visit the Subpoena Help Topic for more information.
Hennepin County District Court policy requires the disposition of Petitioner’s criminal DWI case before scheduling the Implied Consent hearing. On the day the criminal case is resolved, Petitioner must file a scheduling order identifying the issues at the Implied Consent hearing. At that time, a hearing will be scheduled. Failure to file the scheduling order will result in dismissal of the Implied Consent Petition.

Most Implied Consent will fall into one of the following groupings:
  • Criminal case filed and drivers’ license temporarily reinstated
  • Criminal case filed and request for temporary reinstatement of drivers’ license denied by Chief Judge
  • No criminal case filed within 45 days of the Implied Consent and drivers’ license has been temporarily reinstated
  • No criminal case filed within 45 days of the Implied Consent; no request for temporary reinstatement of drivers’ license made by petitioner
These Implied Consent Business Rules below were approved at the 5/19/14 Civil Bench Meeting and replace prior versions.
 

Most Implied Consent will fall into one of the following groupings:

  • Criminal case filed and drivers’ license temporarily reinstated
  • Criminal case filed and request for temporary reinstatement of drivers’ license denied by Chief Judge
  • No criminal case filed within 45 days of the Implied Consent and drivers’ license has been temporarily reinstated
  • No criminal case filed within 45 days of the Implied Consent; no request for temporary reinstatement of drivers’ license made by petitioner

The rules and procedures shown below pertain to the groupings listed above.

Initial Setting of Implied Consent Hearing After Resolution of the Criminal Case (drivers’ license has been temporarily reinstated or 60 days requirement has been waived.)

1.   All hearings will be scheduled within 21-60 days of the date of the scheduling order.  If a party is not available during the 21-60 day time period or there are no dates available within 60 days, Court Administration will schedule for the first available date and the attorney can then follow the continuance procedure.
 
Temporary Reinstatement of Driv ers’ License Denied by the Chief Judge
  1. The Chief Judge’s clerk will set an IC hearing date as soon as possible with at least 3 weeks’ notice. The hearing date must be within 60 days of the date the IC petition was filed.
  2. Court Administration Continuance Policies:  In addition to the policies shown below;
    1. If a continuance is requested by the petitioner, the new hearing date must either be within 60 days of the date the IC petition was filed or the petitioner must waive the 60 day requirement.  If the petitioner waives the 60 day requirement the IC hearing will be continued until resolution of the criminal case.
    2. If a continuance is requested by the Attorney General (AG), the new hearing date must either be within 60 days of the date the IC petition was filed or the AG must address the status of the petitioner’s driver’s license.
  3. The Court’s Continuance Policy:  If a case has been continued once per side, and if the AG has previously given the petitioner a temporary reinstatement, the court should deny any further continuance requests absent good cause.  The pendency of a criminal case is not, in itself, good cause unless petitioner waives the 60 day requirement.
No Criminal Case Was Filed within 45 days of the Filing of the IC Petition
  1. Weekly, Civil Filing will run a report to identify these cases.
  2. If the petitioner’s driver’s license has been temporarily reinstated by the Chief Judge, Civil Filing will set an IC hearing date within 21-60 days of the date of the report.
  3. If the petitioner has not requested a temporary reinstatement of their driver’s license, Civil Filing will set an IC hearing date within 60 days of the date the IC petition was filed with as much advance notice as possible. Civil Filing will grant continuances pursuant to applicable policies and rules.
  4. If a criminal case is filed after a hearing date is scheduled and the petitioner is either temporarily reinstated or waives the 60 days requirement the hearing will be continued until resolution of the criminal case.
  5. If a case has been continued once per side, and if the Petitioner’s license has been temporarily reinstated, the court should deny any further continuance requests absent good cause.  The imminent or possible filing of a criminal case is not, in itself, good cause.

The following rules and procedures apply once an IC hearing date has been set unless otherwise noted above.

 
Court Administration Authority to Grant Requests for Continuances
  1. Civil Filing may grant one continuance per side if requested at least 1 week prior to the hearing date. The continuance may be up to 4 weeks in length.
  2. Civil Filing will give the requesting party available hearing dates within the next 4 weeks and instruct the party to contact the other side to agree on a date.
  3. If a party wants a) a continuance longer than 4 weeks or  b) more than one continuance, c) can’t agree on a date within 4 weeks or d) a continuance with less than 1 week notice, the requesting party must file a Notice of Motion and Motion and pay the motion fee.  The motion will be heard on a regularly scheduled Implied Consent (IC) calendar, if time permits. If time does not permit, the motion will be heard by the judge assigned to hear the Implied Consent calendar that week and the motion hearing must be at least one day before the scheduled Implied Consent hearing  to allow parties to notify witnesses if the continuance is granted.
  4. Civil Filing may grant ONE additional continuances of up to 4 weeks upon stipulation or letter agreement.
 
Notice to Remove or Order to Recuse Filed Day of Hearing
  1. Administration will attempt to find a replacement judge to hear the case. If one is not available, Civil Filing will schedule the case for hearing on the first available date 21 days out. No exceptions for scheduling conflicts will be granted unless a written agreement by the parties is filed.
If Assigned Judge is Unable to Finish Hearing Calendar
  1. Remaining cases will be scheduled on the judge’s own calendar for a Tuesday (all day) or a Thursday afternoon as the Attorney General will be here at those times for the regularly scheduled calendar.

The following general policies apply as noted.


Criminal Case Resolved but No IC Hearing Date Has Been Set
  1. As time permits, if the IC petition was pending when the criminal case was resolved by plea or conviction, and  no scheduling order was filed, Civil Filing will prepare an Order for Dismissal for consideration by the Chief Judge or designee. If an IC petition is dismissed for failure to file a scheduling order, Petitioner may seek to have the dismissal vacated, for good cause, by filing a Notice of Motion and Motion and paying the motion fee. The motion will be scheduled and heard on the regular schedule IC calendar.
  2. If the criminal case was dismissed, Civil Filing will schedule an IC hearing date as soon as possible with at least 3 weeks’ notice.
  3. If the IC petition was filed after the criminal case was resolved (sentenced or dismissed), Civil Filing will set an IC hearing date as soon as possible with at least 3 weeks’ notice.
  4. If a case has been continued once per side, and if the Petitioner’s license has been temporarily reinstated, the court should deny any further continuance requests absent good cause.
Bench Warrant Issued in the Criminal Case
  1. When the case comes to the attention of Civil Filing, Civil Filing will enter a disposition of “Closed Administratively.”
  2. If the petitioner’s driver’s license had been temporarily reinstated, Civil Filing will notify the Chief Judge who may order revocation of the temporary stay.
  3. If the criminal case is eventually resolved and an IC hearing is needed, Civil Filing will reopen the case and set an IC hearing date.
When e-filing an Implied Consent Petition, a petitioner may request a judicial stay of the balance of the driver's license revocation and license plate impoundment periods pursuant to Minn. Stat. § 169A.53, subd. 2(c) pending resolution of the Implied Consent Hearing.  The judicial stay may be granted provided the petitioner meets certain criteria.  To request temporary reinstatement, please follow these steps:
 
  1. Draft a letter addressed to Chief Judge Peter A. Cahill requesting that the balance of the petitioner’s driver's license revocation and/or license plate impoundment periods be stayed pending resolution of the Implied Consent Hearing.  This letter must include the petitioner’s:
a.    Full name
b.    Date of birth
c.    Driver’s license number
d.    License plate number if applicable 
 
Requests that do not include this information will take additional time to process.
 
  1. E-file the letter through the eCourtMN eFile & eServe System.  When e-filing the letter, you must send a courtesy copy to 4thJudgeCahillChambers@courts.state.mn.us to ensure that Judge Cahill receives your request.  This can only be done by entering the above email address into the Courtesy Copy field at the bottom of the Filings webpage.  Failure to copy Judge Cahill on the e-filing will prevent your request from being processed.  Requests sent by fax, email, or mail will NOT be accepted.
  2. When e-filing the letter, if you have not already added yourself as a Service Contact, you must do so.  Once the Judge issues an order, your chosen email address will be sent a copy of the order via the eFile & eServe System.  Orders will not be faxed to attorneys.
The petitioner’s driver’s license must be revoked before the Judge can issue an order staying the balance of the driver’s license revocation period.  Attorneys may check whether their client’s license has been revoked by visiting the Driver & Vehicle Services webpage.
 
Judge Cahill's staff catalogs all requests as they are submitted and reviews each request daily to determine if it meets all of the criteria for consideration by the Judge.  If the petitioner’s request to stay the balance of the revocation period is denied, an Implied Consent Hearing will be scheduled immediately and the date of the hearing will be stated in the order.
 
If you file an Implied Consent Petition with the Court, you can request that your driver's license and license plate be temporarily reinstated until the date of your Implied Consent Hearing.  You will only be granted temporary reinstatement if your circumstances meet the Judge’s criteria. 
 
To request temporary reinstatement, please follow these steps:
 
  1. Write a letter addressed to Chief Judge Peter A. Cahill requesting that the balance of your driver's license revocation and/or license plate impoundment periods be stayed pending resolution of the Implied Consent Hearing.  The letter does not need to be typed.  But the letter must include your:
    1. Full name
    2. Mailing address
    3. Email address if you have one
    4. Date of birth
    5. Driver’s license number
    6. License plate number if applicable
    7. Case number of your Implied Consent case if you have it (27-CV-XXXX) 
Requests that do not include this information will take additional time to process.
 
  1. Make two copies of the letter.  Deliver one copy to Civil Filing on the 3rd floor of the   C Tower of the Hennepin County Government Center, 300 South Sixth Street, Minneapolis, MN 55487. 
  2. Deliver the other copy to Judge Cahill’s chambers on the 7th floor of the C Tower of the Government Center. 
The Judge cannot reinstate your driver’s license until Driver and Vehicle Services has revoked it.  You may check whether your license has been revoked by visiting the Driver & Vehicle Services webpage.
 
Judge Cahill's staff catalogs all requests as they are submitted and reviews each request daily to determine if it meets all of the criteria for consideration by the Judge.  If your request is denied, an Implied Consent Hearing will be scheduled immediately and the date of the hearing will be stated in Judge Cahill’s order.
The Judgments Office processes court orders that direct the entry of judgment, as well as stipulations and orders for dismissal and orders granting summary judgment. This office also handles writs of execution, transcripts of judgments, and "taxation of costs" hearings.
 

How do I appeal a judgment?

Visit our Appeals webpage to learn about the appeals process.
 

What is the telephone number for the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office?

You can all the Sheriff's Office at (612)348-3800. Visit the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office website for more contact information.
 

How do I get a copy of a judgment or other documents in a court case?

For a fee ($7 for each name searched), the court will search for a specific name in the civil judgments records. Judgment search requests can be made in person at the Judgments Office, or by submitting a Judgment Record Search Request Form. To get copies of other kinds of court records, please visit the District Court Records Center webpage.
 

What are the court filing fees?

Please visit our Fees webpage.
 

How do I collect a civil judgment?

Even if you win a judgment in court, it is not always easy to get paid. The parties can make an agreement about paying the judgment, including making payments or settling on a lower amount to satisfy the judgment. Once the judgment is paid in full or to the creditor's satisfaction, then the creditor completes a Satisfaction of Judgment form. One of the parties files that form with the court so the court records show the judgment was paid. If the creditor does not cooperate in signing a Satisfaction of Judgment form, the debtor can file a Motion to Satisfy Judgment form.
 
If the debtor does not pay the creditor after the judgment has been docketed in District Court and the time to appeal has expired, the creditor may take steps to "enforce" the judgment. The Court is not a collection agency and cannot help you locate assets of the other party. Garnishment of a debtor's wages or bank accounts may be an option to enforce a judgment, and another option might be to file a lien against real estate owned by the debtor. Talk to a lawyer to get advice on options to collect on a judgment.
 
Enforcing a judgment may involve additional fees. These fees may be added to the original judgment amount. Steps to begin enforcing the judgment are listed below.
 

STEP 1:

File an Affidavit of Identification with the court.
 

STEP 2:

After filing the Affidavit of Identification, you could ask the court administrator to issue a "Writ of Execution" to garnish wages or bank accounts. The creditor must provide written notice to the debtor of their intent to garnish at least 10 days (or 13 days if notice is served by mail) BEFORE the writ can be served. See sample form Notice of Intent to Garnish Earnings (MN Statutes § 571.925). See also MN Statutes Ch. 571, for more on garnishment laws. Service must be done someone who is at least 18 years old and who is not a party to the case. You can have the sheriff do the service, or someone else, but you must make sure they complete an Affidavit of Service form and that it gets filed with the court.
 
You then take the "Writ of Execution" to the Sheriff's Office with a list of property, bank accounts, and other funds which belong to the judgment debtor and/or the name of the debtor's employer. Usually there is a fee for the sheriff to process the writ.
 
If you don't have any information about the debtor's assets, you may file a Request for Order for Disclosure with the court asking that a judge issue an "Order for Disclosure" that requires the debtor to respond to the creditor by completing a Financial Disclosure form listing all "non-exempt" property and financial information within ten (10) days. Some assets are "exempt" from collection, which means they cannot be taken by the sheriff to pay a judgment.
 

STEP 3:

If the debtor fails to respond to the Order for Disclosure within the time allowed, the creditor may file an Affidavit in Support of Order to Show Cause. If the court determines that you meet all of the requirements, it can issue an "Order to Show Cause," which requires the debtor to go to a hearing and explain to the judge why he or she disobeyed the Order for Disclosure. If debtor fails to appear at the hearing, the judge may impose consequences and can issue a "bench warrant" for the debtor's arrest.
 
Debt Collection and Garnishment at LawHelpMN.org Learn more at Debt Collection and Garnishment on LawHelpMN.org.
 
NOTE: A judgment can be enforced for ten (10) years from the date it was "entered" into the court record. It can also be "renewed" if not satisfied (paid) within the 10 years. To enforce a judgment that was not paid during the 10 year time frame, you have to start a new lawsuit before the end of the 10 year period, based on a claim for failure to pay a judgment. See MN Statutes § 541.04. A lawsuit is started by serving a Summons and Complaint on the judgment debtor. You should talk to a lawyer to get advice on how to prepare the papers and handle the case. Court staff cannot give legal advice.
 

How can I get a copy of my credit report? Is there a way to fix an error on a report?

This Legal Fact Sheet on Credit Reports explains how to get a copy of your credit report and correct errors that may appear on it. It also includes contact information on credit bureaus and a sample copy request form.
 
Credit and Credit Reports at LawHelpMN.org Learn more at Credit and Credit Reports on LawHelpMN.org.
Foreign judgments may be filed at the Judgments Department on C-3 (3rd floor) of the Hennepin County Government Center or mailed to:
Hennepin County District Court
Judgments, C-3
300 South Sixth Street
Minneapolis, MN 55487-0332
 
To open a foreign judgment case, the following must be filed:
  • A certified copy of the judgment from the out-of-state or out-of-country court.
  • An Affidavit of Identification of both the debtor and creditor.
  • Filing fees for foreign judgments
  • There is a 20-day stay from the date of filing to the date of judgment.
For further information, please refer to the Uniform Enforcement of Foreign Judgments Act in the MN Statutes §§ 548.26 - 548.33.  insert link
Judgments are good for ten years from the date of entry. Pursuant to MN Statutes § 541.04 and § 548.09, judgments entered may be renewed for another ten years. The renewal process must be executed prior to the expiration of the judgment.

Court staff cannot give legal advice about renewing your judgment. Please consult with an attorney. You could also visit the Legal Access Point Clinic at the court's Self-Help Center.

Hearing on Taxation of Costs

To schedule a hearing date and time, please call the Judgments Office at (612) 348-3169
 

Objecting to Taxation of Costs

If either party disagrees with the costs awarded, refer to Rule 54.04 of the MN Rules of Civil Procedures.
 

Taxable Costs

1. Appeal costs, statutory to prevailing party (MN Statute 357.08) 549.01
2. Certified copy of any instrument from a civil proceeding 357.021
3. Certified copies of documents recorded or filed in any public office AND used at trial/summary judgment hearing/arbitration 357.31
4. Certificate as to existence or non-existence of judgments docketed 357.021
5. Deposition costs of witness who is not a party/agent AND deposition is used at trial/summary judgment hearing/arbitration 357.31
6. Deposition costs of party or an agent of a party if the depositions used at trial/summary judgment hearing/arbitration  
7. Deposition costs of videotape depositions if used at trial/summary judgment hearing/arbitration 357.31
8. A reader of a written deposition used at trial $300.00  
9. Execution/filing fees (writ of attachment, injunction, habeas corpus, mandamus, quo warranto, certiorari,
other writs) $57.00     357.021
10. Exhibits, reasonable costs of obtaining, if used at trial/summary judgment hearing/arbitration 357.315
11. Filing Fee (may include $5 credit card transaction fee if e-filed) $324.00 357.021
12. Jury Fee $102.00 357.021
13. Motion Fee $102.00 357.02
14. Mediation fee, if court ordered  
15. Medical records, costs of obtaining, whether or not used at trial/summary judgment hearing/arbitration 357.315
16. Motion/Demurrer costs 549.11
17. Notary affidavit costs $1.00 357.17
18. Photocopying expenses, if related to exhibits, items used at trial/summary judgment hearing/arbitration 357. 315
19. Requests for trial after arbitration fee $102.00 357.021
20. Satisfaction of judgment, partial satisfaction, assignment of judgment fee $7.50 549.02 
21. Service of Process fee (under MN Statute 357.09 and may include $3.00 e-service fee) 549.04
22. Statutory Costs $200.00 549.02
23. Subpoena Fees $18.00 357.021
24. Transcript of judgment fee, filing and docketing judgment fee $42.00 357.021
25. Witness fees – expert, for appearance at trial; includes airfare, hotel, meal and taxi expenses pursuant
to State travel guidelines (upper limit on expenses)  
26. Witness fees – non-expert, for appearance at trial $20.00/day + $.28/mile 357.22
27. Witness fees – non-expert, for taxation of travel such as airfare, hotel, meal or taxi expenses, who testify at trial pursuant to State travel guidelines.  
 

Non-Taxable Costs

1. Depositions used solely for discovery: Requires that only the costs of depositions or documents that are
“necessarily used on trial of a cause or on the assessment of damages” shall be allowed in the taxation of costs. 357.31
2. Tax & telephone costs; Costs should be considered similar to attorney’s fees and are part of the cost of doing business.  
3. Travel expenses, of attorneys attending depositions: These are at the judge’s discretion.  
4. IME (Independent Medical Examiner):  This is an expense related to preparation outside the courtroom.  
5. No costs allowed as to a “Party” to the action.
Visit the Name Change Help Topic to learn more about name changes.
MN Statutes Chapter 259 - Change of Name for contains additional requirements pertaining to ALL name change applications.
 

Adult Changing Name

  • You must file in the county where you live.
  • You must have lived within the State of Minnesota at least six months.
  • At the hearing you must bring two adult witnesses who have known you for not less than one year. Your witnesses may be relatives. If you are married, one of your witnesses should be your spouse. The witnesses should be able to speak and understand English. If not, you will need to provide an interpreter for your witness at your own expense.
If you own your home or other real estate, you need to have the legal description when you file your documents (it will not be your address). This information is available on your Property Tax Statement.
 

Parent(s) Changing Child(ren)’s Name(s)

  • You must file in the County where you live.
  • You must have lived within the State of Minnesota for at least six months.
  • The child must be present at the hearing.
  • Only one parent is required to be at the hearing.
  • You must bring two adult witnesses who have known you for at least one year or longer (in addition to the one parent). The witnesses should be able to speak and understand English. If not, you will need to provide an interpreter for your witness at your own expense.
  • If both parents come to the hearing you only need to bring one witness.
  • If the parents do not live together, the parent seeking the name change must send a certified letter to the absent parent indicating the date, time and place of the hearing. (If the current address of the absent parent is not known, you must mail a certified letter to the last known address of the absent parent.) Bring proof of mailing with you to court.
  • If the absent parent’s past or present address is unknown to you: You must send a regular letter to a relative of the absent parent informing them to notify the absent parent of the date, time and place of the hearing. Bring proof of mailing the certified letter and a copy of the letter to the hearing.
  • If the certified letter is returned to you as undelivered you must bring the unopened letter to your court hearing.
  • You must set your court hearing at least 30 days from the day you will mail the certificate letter. This allows enough time for your certified letter to be returned to you if it is undeliverable.
If the biological father is not listed on the birth certificate and is not named by court order, you may not have to notify him. Bring a certified copy of the child’s birth certificate to your court appearance.
 

Court Forms

You can dowload the packet of Name Change Forms & Instructions.
Type or print neatly on the forms in black ink. Take your forms to the Civil Intake counter on the Public Service Level (2nd floor) of the Hennepin Co. Govt. Center. The Civil Intake Department cannot fill out your forms for you, but they can show you an example of how to fill out the forms.

Do not sign the application until you are at the courthouse. Your signature must be witnessed and notarized by a court clerk.

If you own land, even the house you live in, you must get the "legal description" of the property. The "legal description" is not the mailing address of the property. The description is on the deed, and it is available at the Property Recorder's Office in the county where the property is located.

Bring your court forms to the Civil Intake counter on the Public Service Level (2nd floor) of the Hennepin Co. Govt. Center in downtown Minneapolis.
 

Getting a Hearing Date

Your case will be assigned to a judge, and the court will mail you a "Notice of Judicial Assignment" approximately one week after you file your case. You can then contact the judge's clerk for further instructions about scheduling a hearing.
When you choose a date make sure it is convenient for your witnesses.

To open a case, you must pay a filing fee. If you are low income and cannot afford the fee, you can ask the court for a fee waiver. The fee is due at the time of filing, and you can pay by cash or check made out to District Court Administrator. There is also a fee for copies of the final order signed by the judge.
 

Day of the Hearing

Come at the assigned time with your two adult witnesses and go straight to the courtroom.

If the name change is for a minor or includes a minor, the minor must be present. Three adults must be present (yourself and your two witnesses) and all minors who might be changing their names.

If you are in a situation where you had to notify the non-applicant parent by certified mail, be sure you have the proof of mailing with you.

If your name change is granted, it is your responsibility to notify all interested people, businesses, employers, schools, etc., of your new name. Some will require a certified copy of the Order Granting Name Change. An list will be given to you in court as to whom you may need to notify.
 

After the Hearing

You must file a certified copy of the order with the county recorder of any county in which you, your spouse, or minor children have an interest in land.
The following is a list of additional items to consider changing:
  • Your driver’s license or Minnesota ID card must be changed within 30 days. For more information, see MN Department of Public Safety.
  • Your Social Security registration. (Telephone Contact Number is (800) 772-1213)
  • Your voter’s registration.
  • State and federal authorities.
  • Insurance companies and pension/retirement companies or human resources department at work.
  • Social service or other entitlement programs.
  • Car titles (and again the insurance company)
  • Notify your bank and other institutions where you have loans, checking accounts, and savings, and cash cards.
  • Amend your will if you have one. See your attorney about this and other legal items.
  • Credit card accounts and other charge accounts should be changed.
  • Passports (obtain information from your local license center)
  • School (including college and university) records
  • If you are of draft age, the registration office should be informed of your new name.
  • Notify military benefits offices, including the Veterans Administration, if you have such rights.
  • Your doctors’ offices, dentist, pharmacy, and hospital may need to amend their records so your future insurance claims can be properly processed with your insurance carriers.
  • Inform the U.S. Postal Service and publishers of periodicals and publications.
  • Your Tribe of registration if you are an enrolled Native American.
  • Student loan servicing institution.
  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, 2901 Metro Drive, Bloomington, MN 55425.
  • Legal authorities, if there are records of any felonies.
It is your responsiblity to change your name on your other records.
 

Getting Certified Copies of Signed Order Granting Name Change

The certified copy will have a raised Court seal on it. You may make several copies of it. Some of the agencies you will need to notify may want to see your official certified copy but will only keep a copy.

Certified Copies are not automatically made. They must be requested and paid for before they will be given or sent.

A request may be made at the time you file your application and the certified copy fee may be paid at that time. Your certified copy will be mailed out two to three weeks after your hearing.
Request for certified/uncertified copies can also be made after the hearing either in person or by mail.

You may make additional photocopies of the certified copy as needed. A certified copy of the Order is required to change your driver’s license, social security records, birth certificate, etc. Birth certificates are changed at the MN Dept. of Health, Office of Vital Statistics.
 

Additional Information

You do not have to be a citizen of the United States to have your name changed, but you must contact U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services at (612) 854-7754 to determine any special requirements the Department may have.

To change the name of a child born out-of-wedlock when the biological parents get married, a change of name hearing in court is not needed. Contact the MN Dept. of Health at (612) 676-5120. Ask what the cost is to file to have the child’s name changed and the cost of the certified copy of the corrected birth certificate.
 

Person with Felony Conviction(s)

MN Statutes § 259.13.

You must serve a notice of your name change application on the prosecuting authority responsible for your felony before filing your application with the court. If your felony is from another state or a federal charge, you must serve the MN Attorney General. If you have more than one felony, all prosecuting authorities and/or the Attorney General must be served. Proof(s) of service must accompany your Application for Name Change when you filed with the court.

If the prosecuting authority or Attorney General files an objection to your name change, and you wish to proceed with your Application for Name Change, you must contest the objection of the prosecuting authority or Attorney General. To do this, you must file a motion with the court for an order permitting the requested name change and contact the judge assigned to your case for a hearing date. You will need to serve the prosecuting authority notice of the hearing date and a copy of your motion. You will need to prove to the Court by clear and convincing evidence that your application for name change is not based on the intent to defraud, is made in good faith, will not cause injury to a person and will not compromise public safety. Absent this evidence, your name change will not be granted.

Hennepin County Government Center

4th District Civil Court
Hennepin County Govt. Ctr.
300 South 6th Street, C-332
Minneapolis, MN 55487 Map
Phone: (612) 348-3164
Fax: (612) 348-2131
Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m., Monday - Friday
Closed Holidays


About Civil Court

The Civil Court Division is located in the C-Tower of the Hennepin County Government Center (where to link?) in downtown Minneapolis. The main in-person customer service area is the Civil Filing Counter on the 3rd floor. The Civil Division handles a range of civil case types from complex contract and personal injury cases, to harassment and administrative default cases. Our mission is to provide excellent customer service to all court users, including the public, parties, justice agencies, and the media.

Conciliation Court and Housing Court are also part of Hennepin Civil Court.